May 28, 2016

What a Blessing that My Paintings Are Getting Recognition and Awards! But how Stressful Entering Shows! lol

I am so happy, I can barely believe it!

In the last few months I entered my paintings in a few judged exhibitions, and I have brought home several ribbons - which stand for awards received.

It's amazing to me!

Every time that I am deciding what to enter in a show I get attacked by hundreds of self-doubting dilemmas, and usually I ponder not entering at all.

"54 S. High St." by Robie Benve. I was very nervous about this painting, done at the Dublin Paint Out, on a cold and rainy day, while I was very busy being the chair of the event. I was also intimidated by the caliber of the other artists that participated. Yet, I got an Honorable Mention award. :D So grateful!


What if my work is the worst of the show? What if it's hung next of a wonderfully executed piece and all the flaws are even more evident?

When it comes to expose my work to the public viewing, I become hyper sensitive.
I look at pieces that I enjoyed painting and see things that I could have done differently. Better.
I look at paintings that I thought were some of my best, and I suddenly see flaws and weaknesses.


Here is a painting from another show that is up right now. I entered this show as new member of an art league whose members have been painting for decades, and I was quite nervous about the first impression that they would get from this newbie (me). When I went to see the show hung, this painting had a ribbon for third place and three more of my paintings got a Honorable Mention Awards! What a wonderful surprise! :D - "Much Needed" by Robie Benve.


I loved making this painting, starting from the beautiful reference photo throughout the painting process. Then, when it was time to enter the DAAL fall show last November, I got cold feet and started doubting the composition and the execution. I could see many things that could be done differently. Was it a good idea to enter it?
Then it got Third Place award! Often it's all in my had. - "Glimpse" by Robie Benve.


It has been said millions of times, and I am going to repeat it here:
We are our own worst critics.

Painting is a personal experience. It's a process that brings us in touch with our inner self.
Having strangers evaluate the outcome of that process, without having been there, without having walked the walk and seen the inner view, suddenly makes me look at the painting differently.
How does it look to the outsider?
Certainly it can't be good.
Oh my gosh, would it be better if I did not enter this show?

Usually I try to embrace the "Fake it till you make it" mode, and submit my entry form despite the doubts.

Sometimes, when the planets align and the blessings fall from the sky, I get a ribbon.

And so I think:
"Oh, it wasn't that bad after all. Maybe my first impression was good, when I thought it was a decent painting."
"Maybe the love I put into those brushstrokes does show and speak to the viewer somehow."

And all is well again. Self-confidence is (temporarily) back.

Until it's time to enter the next show... ahah

"Shine Your Light" got an Honorable Mention at the DAAL Spring show, with a very nice comment from the judge.


May 20, 2016

One of My Paintings Picked as Backround for UCSF Brochure!



This is one of those serendipity events in my life that I can't keep from bragging about.
I am very proud of it.

I was contacted by Gabriella Moreno, LCSW director of the Path Program at UCSF, and she kindly asked me if they could use the image of one of my painting for they brochure. I was thrilled and honored.

I'm in amazement that they found my painting in the universe of images on the web!I'm very happy that they liked it and it fit so well the meaning of the Program.


The title I picked for the image is absolutely perfect, and that is where the true serendipity takes place. The original title of the painting was "Hope", as simple as that.

When I posted it on FAA, where I have my art available for prints, I changed the title to "Hope - Path to Tomorrow", to make it more searchable, and that made all the difference.

The effect of enriching the title with more keywords really made the magic of making it "searchable".


Note to self: pay more attention to how you pick the titles of your paintings from now on. It's not only about the image. :)

On a side note, I truly admire the ethics and professionalism of Gabriella Moreno and the Path Program team. They asked for permission to use the image and they gave me credit on the brochure and their web site. That's awesome.
All artists should receive that kind of respect for their work.

Thanks you, thank you!!!!

May 14, 2016

Bright Rainy Day - Oil Painting

"Bright Rainy Day"
9"x12"
Oil on board, unframed


What do you do when you get a gray, rainy day?

I try to make it colorful.

This was my intent with this painting.
It was such a dull day that I took it upon myself to put some color into it. I started by toning the board red, and that really gave a popping start to the composition.
I also kept the greens brighter than what I saw.
Overall I think that I succeeded making it look like there was no sun, but without the typical grayish colors of an overcast day.

Some days that's exactly what we need to do. 
Keep the smile on our lips and the love in our hearts, even if life is not smiling back at us.

I painted this at Scioto Park in Dublin, OH, which happens to be one of my favorite outdoors painting locations. It's right on the banks of the Scioto river, and that offers so many opportunities for painting inspirations.
I do prefer when it's sunny, though, when I can get out from under the shelter and paint by the water. :)


Bright Rainy Day - Oil Painting

"Bright Rainy Day"
9"x12"
Oil on board, unframed


What do you do when you get a gray, rainy day?
I try to make it colorful.
This was my intent with this painting.
It was such a dull day that I took it upon myself to put some color into it. I started by toning the board red, and that really gave a popping start to the composition.
I also kept the greens brighter than what I saw.
Overall I think that I succeeded making it look like there was no sun, but without the typical grayish colors of an overcast day.

Some days that's exactly what we need to do. 
Keep the smile on our lips and the love in our hearts, even if life is not smiling back at us.

I painted this at Scioto Park in Dublin, OH, which happens to be one of my favorite outdoors painting locations. It's right on the banks of the Scioto river, and that offers so many opportunities for painting inspirations.
I do prefer when it's sunny, though, when I can get out from under the shelter and paint by the water. :)


May 13, 2016

These Clouds Too Shall Pass - Oil Painting at Metro Park


"These Clouds Too Shall Pass"
8"x10"
Oil on board

Some days start as a nuisance from the beginning. You can just tell.
The only way to survive and keep good things coming your way is to realize that no matter what, things are deemed to get better.
The clouds are only temporary, the sun will shine again.

Have faith.
Think positive.
Expect only the best to happen.

Good times will come.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, 
by prayer and petition, 
with thanksgiving, 
present your requests to God. 
Philippians 4:6

I painted this picture at a local park, specifically Walnut Woods Metro park, in Groveport, OH.
It was a windy day, and the clouds kept coming and then moving out, just for more clouds to come. The light was changing quickly from sunny to cloudy, one of the typical challenges for plein air painters, you've got to learn to stick with the impression you want to render and avoid "chasing the light".
I'm learning. : )